A Simple Guide to Taking Care of Your Chickens This Winter

A Simple Guide to Taking Care of Your Chickens This Winter

A Simple Guide to Taking Care of Your Chickens This Winter

A Simple Guide to Taking Care of Your Chickens This Winter

Winter is upon us. Most of the United States is deep into winter, struggling with freezing temperatures and snow. Winter makes taking care of chickens a bit trickier. If this is your first winter with chickens, you might feel intimidated by the care. Don’t fret! Taking care of your chickens this winter is going to be a breeze.

9 Tips for Taking Care of Your Chickens This Winter

Opt Out of Heat Lights

Many people consider putting heat lights in your chicken coop. Some people prefer to add heat lamps. Unfortunately, there are many reasons you shouldn’t. The main reason to steer clear of heat lamps is that your chicken coop is at risk for a fire. The bedding is all prone to fire.
Chickens huddle together for warmth. You want to make sure that your coop has plenty of ventilation to reduce moisture buildup. Also, you want to make sure there is air circulation, but not drafty.

Pick Winter Breeds

Most chickens can handle winter temperatures, but some breeds handle colder temperatures much better. Some breeds of chickens are hardier than others, meaning that they adapt to the cold temperatures faster. If you live in an area that receives low temperatures every winter, it is wise to pick some cold-hardy chickens. Popular breeds include Barred Rocks, Australorps, Buff Orpingtons, and Rhode Island Reds. read this article if you are thinking about Which Chicken Breed is Right for Your Homestead?

Rhode Island Reds

Rhode Island Reds Rooster

Learn and Implement the Deep Litter Method

The deep litter method is one of the best ways to keep heat in your coop without a lamp, while not having to clean out the coop through the cold winter. The deep litter method allows all of the bedding material and chicken poop to build up over the year. You will have about a foot of composting materials. Composting generates heat, naturally warming your chicken coop this winter. Chicken owners note that the difference can be huge!

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