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13 Trees You Should Never Plant In Your Yard

13 Trees You Should Never Plant In Your Yard

13 Trees You Should Never Plant In Your Yard

For most people, the end of summer and approach of autumn means cooler temperatures, harvest time for crops, and of course, the vibrant colors of changing leaves. For those looking to grow trees or shrubs, however, the approaching fall means it is almost the perfect time to plant for next season. Cooler air with warm earth gives trees and shrubs a chance to establish good root growth before having to face the heat of another summer.

As you prepare to plant, be mindful that while some tree varieties grow quickly or provide a lot of shade, they can come with some less-than-desirable and unexpected consequences. Following is a list of trees you should avoid incorporating into your landscape this fall:

Ash

Ash-tree
via wikimedia.org cc

Ash trees are very prevalent around major metropolitan areas. Commonly used to beautify sidewalks and park settings, these beautiful and strong trees are also the source of professional baseball bats. As rock-hard as ash wood can be, however, this tree is widely being wiped out by a tiny beetle called the emerald ash borer. If you want a tree that will be a long-term resident of your landscape, your money would be better spent on another variety!

Black Walnut

Black WalnutOne of America’s most valuable and beautiful native trees, black walnuts are so sought after for their use in furniture and cabinet making that they actually inspire theft in some areas! For home planting, however, black walnut trees produce a lot of pollen and hard flesh-covered seeds that may just drive you nuts when they litter your yard in the fall. Worse yet, however, are the toxins secreted by this tree that can pretty much wipe out nearby flower beds and vegetable gardens.

Bradford Pear

Bradford Pear

The Bradford pear tree became a favorite of developers due to its ability to create instant shade and grow quickly. The tree produces beautiful white flowers in the spring, but has more than its share of issues. Among them, the fact that the fast growth of the tree leads to weak wood that can be a hazard during storms or windy conditions. Furthermore, the beautiful blossoms are actually quite high on the stench scale. In many areas the Bradford pear is also earning a reputation as an invasive weed.

Eucalyptus

Eucalyptus
Randy Robertson via flickr cc

Native to Australia, eucalyptus trees were imported and favored in America for their rapid rate of growth. In fact some varieties can grow up to ten feet in a single year. Unfortunately, eucalyptus can be a bit of a maintenance nightmare due to its seasonal shedding of its bark. Large sticky branches are also known to suddenly drop off and come crashing to the ground (or whatever else happens to be below them).

Gingko

Gingko

Ancient and beautiful, gingko trees are hardy in various climates and radiate beautiful yellow colors from their fan-like leaves in the fall. Unfortunately, the female variety of a gingko biloba produces some of the messiest and smelliest fruits of any tree. Often referred to as a “trash tree”, the smell of the distinctive fruits dumped by a female gingko is often compared to that of vomit.

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